Program 2022

This event aims to create collaborations among members, a better network for participants, and many new insights into how to conduct, organize, and fund interdisciplinary research. To facilitate this, the program contains scientific talks to demonstrate the breadth of scientific and methodological approaches within the community, a keynote lecture by Daniela Kraft (soft matter physics, Leiden University), a keynote lecture by a representative from NWO on funding through (interdisciplinary) consortia, and a panel discussion involving senior scientists from governmental institutions, academia, and industry on ‘team science in an interdisciplinary setting’. Moreover, the program allows for plenty of interaction time between participants for informal networking. This will be reinforced by a special workshop by Dr. Maria Sovago, a professional coach for scientists on the first evening.

Note: The best presentation in the short-talk sessions will receive a Eye-openers interview (sponsored by KNCV). The eye-opener allows you to highlight your work in a storytelling video that is supported with animations. Please register here.

Day 1 (Wednesday, August 31st, 2022)—Networking

18:30 Dinner

20:30 Networking Activity, organized Maria Sovago (founder of Stralia)

21:30 Drinks

 

Day 2 (Thursday, September 1st, 2022) —Scientific session

9:00 Keynote lecture: Daniela Kraft (Soft Matter Physics, Leiden University)

10:00 Session 1 of 4 shorter talks (by early career researchers)

11:30 Coffee break

12:00 Funding talk by a NWO representative ‘Navigating and building large consortia’

12:30 lunch

13:30 Panel Discussion ‘team science in an interdisciplinary setting’

15:00 Coffee break

15:30 Session 2 of 4 shorter talks (by early career researchers)

17:00 KNCV Eye-opener award, for the best presentation in the short-talk series. 

17:10 Closing and borrel

Abstract: Prof. Daniela Kraft (Soft Matter Physics, Leiden University):
“Flexible colloidal structures – from micron-sized hinges to robots”

Functionality often is linked to structural flexibility, from macroscopic devices and robots all the way down to proteins and molecules. On the microscopic scale, thermal motion induces shape changes in flexible structures, which is thought to be important for various biological functions, from enhancing diffusion to inhibiting a proteins activity in allosteric regulation. However, surprisingly little is known about the precise effect of structural flexibility.

In this talk, I will present how we designed colloidal hinges, joints, and sliders, that can impart flexibility in microscopic structures.  I will illustrate the variety of flexible structures that we could assemble and describe how their structural flexibility affects their diffusive motion and self-assembly. Finally, I will show some of the surprising findings we made while attempting to integrate self-propelled motor elements into flexible structures – the final step towards creating a new class of shape-changing materials and machines.

Abstract: Dr. Maria Sovago (founder of Stralia)
“Chemists on Stage: networking workshop”

Connect, network, team up! We, the scientists, need to do it every day. Because no matter what our aim is – perform research, teach, pitch, share our results and knowledge or present ourself – IT IS US ON STAGE!

In this workshop, we use theatre techniques adapted for scientists to bring you to the next level of connection with your colleagues and with the chemistry community. We transform you from a standard scientist to YOU 2.0. You will gain confidence, learn how to network and have fun! You will leave the workshop full of energy, power and thirst to perform. We will together make our NextGenChem@NL community stronger!
Shine with us during this adventurous workshop!

About Maria: The lecture will be given by Dr. Maria Sovago, founder of Stralia. Maria has a PhD in Physics from AMOLF, The Netherlands. She worked as a team leader and project manager for 8 years at TNO, Unilever and NWO (Dutch Council). She has 10+ years of experience in coaching scientists and researchers at a very personal level. Working in academia for many years in various positions, Maria knows well all the aspects of an academic environment. Over the years, Maria has been coaching and mentoring many students, teachers, and full-professors in the beta fields: from Mathematics to Life-Sciences. She is also teaching and leading the Systems Engineering programme within the Applied Sciences faculty at Delft University of Technology for 1 day/week.